MAC tools for HTML

 

This page provides some information regarding the software tools that I've used/use to create, edit and publish my web pages. I've been working on these web pages since 1996, and I've been designing web pages since 1993. As my efforts are strictly a hobby, I haven't really delved into the highly commercial aspects of web page design. In other words, I'm not up to date on all the latest programming: Java, JavaScript, PHP and XML. I have done a little cgi-bin/perl scripting, and I find it to be very useful. I don't design web pages for a living; although I do think that would be a cool job. I simply tinker a bit for my own pleasure (and to support residents in my community). This document is an attempt to impart what I hope will be seen as a few words of advice regarding some useful web page design tools for Mac users.

As I use a Mac, my software/advice will be focused towards those using Macs to design web pages. I write and publish my web pages from the desktop of my 27-inch iMac (2019). My computer is powereed by a 64 bit, ninth generation 'Coffee Lake' i5 chip. The CPU contains a 3.7GHz (4.6GHz w/Turbo boost) i5 processor (6 processors on one chip), with 32Gb of DDR4 SDRAM, 26.5TB of hard drive storage space, and macOS 11.4 (Big Sur) - As of 29 May, 2021. My web sites are posted to the internet at:

https://www.robsworld.org, https://www.robsworld.net, https://www.vaessen.net, https://www.vaessen.name, https://www.vaessen.ws, and https://www.damnspammers.com - Other websites/domains that I own: vaessen.email, spaceforce.ltd, spacecommand.us, iamageni.us

If you're a Mac user, and are just learning HTML; then this page might be of some help. I remember how frustrating it was when I first started publishing web pages. Things were never easy, or convenient. I had to hunt for tools, and try them all. Most were buggy and poorly written. It took some time, but I've pretty much got the tool chest nailed down.

Here then, are some of the software tools that I use to create, edit and publish my web pages. Perhaps you'll find something useful in this list.

Author: Robert L. Vaessen e-mail:

 

 

Dreamweaver CC

 

Dreamweaver CC:
I'm currently using Version 21.1 (build 15413) - As of 12 Jan, 2021

I'm currently using Dreamweaver CC. I had resisted for many years, but I've finally gone and done it. I've paid for the 'Creative Cloud', otherwise known as the 'Dollar Suck' version of Dreamweaver. Yes, I broke down and purchased/began paying for the 'Subscription' based version of the software. I originally purchased Drewamweaver MX back in May of 2002 (Made by Macromedia back then). I upgraded to Dreamweaver CS5 and then C5.5 years later (The software was acquired by Adobe in 2005). Often, but not always, I purchased the annual updates. Eventually, Adobe decided to stop updating the CS version of Dreamweaver, and they opted to create this 'Creative Cloud' version. It's software built around the 'Subscription' based model. I don't like the fact that I have to pay an annual fee, regardless of whether I want to upgrade or not. I wonder what would happen if I stop paying the subscription fee?

Learning HTML, and creating rich and appealing web sites, can be a difficult endeavor. In October of 2019, I finally updated my web design work horse. I upgraded from Dreamweaver CS5.5 to Adobe's latest version of Dreamweaver. My last major upgrade was in May of 2011. This switch from Dreamweaver CS5 to the CC version is quite a major shift. It's up there with my transition from Dreamweaver MX to Dreamweaver CS5. I've been using Dreamweaver (various different versions) since at least 2002, and I find it to be the best tool for my needs. I really like the ability to view and work in a WYSIWYG interface, while simultaneously having the code view available for any tweaking or hands-on coding. With my awesome 30" monitor, I can even display both views in a vertical orientation. Aside from the more powerful features (which I'm not knowledgeable enough to use), CC has several features that the novice coder can appreciate.

Adobe stopped selling perpetualy licensed 'disk' based licenses back in June of 2013. With the introduction of their Creative Cloud (CC) version of software, they started selling 'Subscription' based licenses. In other words, you know longer owned the software that you paid for. From that point forward, you are simply purchasing or paying for 'Access' to the software. If you stop paying, they cut of access to the software - I despise this model of software, and honestly think that it's criminal...

So, why did I opt to purchase/pay for the CC version of Dreamweaver? Well, it's a long story, but in the end they won out. There's just nothing that comes close, and the CS5.5 version stopped working under Apple's latest OS (macOS 10.15 Catalina). Apple stopped supporting 32 bit applications in October of 2019 (with the release of macOS 10.15). With the OS upgrade, Dreamweaver CS5.5 stopped working, so my options were - Pay for the subscription version, or use something else. While I've got plenty of other HTML editing tools at my disposal. There is simply no comparison (on the Mac) when it comes to the power and flexibility of Dreamweaver. I simply couldn't find anything else that does everything I want and need. So, despite the fact that despise the 'Subscription' based model of software, I broke down and bought an entire year's worth of licensing up front. That helps reduce the cost some, but paying approximately $250.00 for the software is a significant amount of money for someone who isn't making a living by writing/maintaining web pages as a hobby.

Note: Fingers crossed, I'm trying to learn (as of Nov 2019) how to integrate an SQL/MySQL database into my site. I've downloaded the 'Server Behavior & Database extension for Dreamweaver (thankfully it's free), and I'm watching a YouTube tutorial on how to use databases with Dreamweaver. Why? Well: Movie collection, Music collection, Movie reviews, Monster listing, NPC listing, Places visited... I've got a lot of data that could be displayed more efficiently (better than a scrolling flat file in a frame), while simultaneously improving the search features available to visitors. I'm going to give a serious try... Well, so much for that idea. The 'Server Behavior & Database extension for Dreamweaver is incompatible with DW CC versions after the initial 2017 release. Despite the fact that the extension seemed to install, it is not available under the Extensions menu. Adobe has deprecated it/made it 'invisible' to the interface, so that it cannot be used. ...Starting over; sure would be nice if Adobe would allow an extension that helps me integrate a database/database functionality into my website.

Another update: 12 Nov, 2019 - Apparently, installing the 'Server Behavior & Database Extension', it seems that it did install the components that should have been installed (Databases, Bindings and Server Behaviors), but nothing shows up under the 'Windows->Extensions' menu, because Adobe disabled Extensions in such a way as they don't show up, can't be accessed in that manner any more. Right?

I've been using Dreamweaver (various differnt versions, going back to MX version (I purchased DW-MX in Feb of 2003) by Marcromedia (before Adobe acquired Macromedia in 2005)) for some time now, and really appreciate some of it's more powerful features. It's a world class champ when it comes to editing HTML tables. With a tool box full of things I've yet to use, I'm sure I'll be learning more about HTML and CSS in the future. Hopefully, Adobe can avoid some of the other issues they've induced by their refusal to recognize case sesitivity.
<https://www.adobe.com/products/dreamweaver.html>


 

BBEdit

 

BBEdit:
The version that I'm currently running is version 13.5.6 (415118, 64-bit Intel, sandboxed) - As of 01 May, 2021

This gem was missing from my 'Favs' page for some time. I removed it back in May of 2007. I had decided that Dreamweaver met all my needs. That was before things changed. Due to problems with Adobe products (this was back in 2011), I decided it was time to bring BBEdit back into the fold. I purchased a new version of BBEdit in October of 2011 (through the Mac 'App Store'*). At a discounted introductory price of ~$40; one thing had changed with BBEdit - They lowered the price to a more manageable target. The full version (through the App Store/and their online store) is only ~$50.00. That's a lot better than their historical pricing of more than $100.00 for the full version. Other notable changes (made to comply with App Store requirements). Command line capability was not included in the version purchased through the App Store. You can download and add that capability outside the App Store. Additionally, the ability to save changes to files that you don't own has been removed from the App Store version. Advanced users can also work around this limitation. In my opinion, the minor changes are well worth the more than 100 new features coupled with the amazing drop in price! *Note: If you prefer (I do), you can purchase/download the full version (non-App store version) directly (I have) from BareBones (that also has a more reasonable price).

BBEdit is a high-performance text and code editor for the Macintosh, and I'm running version 13 (see above for most recent version). It's designed and crafted for the editing, searching, transformation, and manipulation of text and code (several different flavors of code/languages). BBEdit provides a vast array of general-purpose features which are useful for a wide variety of tasks, and includes many special purpose features which have been specifically developed in response to the needs of Web authors and software developers. It's an absolute must for any HTML author, software code developer and hardcore Mac enthusiasts. My needs for BBEdit no longer revolve around HTML editing. While I still use BBEdit for some of my HTML coding, I primarily use it for plaintext editing and regular expression work. It's ability to search, find, compare, replace text and handle plain-text documents is simply unparalleled.

BBEdit 13 contains many new features, enhancements, and refinements to existing features. Some of the most powerful and useful new features are the new 'Grep' tools. The pattern playground and grep cheat sheat are extremely useful for me, as I've often used grep as a way to build spam detecting and defeating formulas using some standalone tools. Now BBEdit has some built in support for grep goodness. BBEdit 13 contains over a hundred additions, changes, and refinements. The detailed change notes contain complete information on what is new and changed in this version.Be sure to check out all the new goodness in the release notes.
<http://www.barebones.com/products/bbedit/bbedit13.html>
<https://www.barebones.com/support/bbedit/updates.html>
<https://www.barebones.com/products/bbedit/>


 

iWork in the iCloud

 

 

 

 

 

Pages

 

Pages

Mac and iOS
vaersion of Pages

 

 

Keynote

 

Keynote

Mac and iOS
versions of Keynote

 

 

Numbers

 

Numbers

Mac and iOS
versions of Numbers

 

iWork / Apple's Productivity Applications:
Apple's productivity suite is three applications with iCloud integration. I'm running various versions of the component software. I'm running two versions of Apple's Productivity Apps on my Apple computing devices. One version is designed for the desktop, and another version is designed for mobile devices (that's normal as the two versions are built on a different code base). (FYI: The 2014 release and the 'Legacy' "iWork '09" release stopped working with the release of macOS 10.15 (I upated to macOS 10.15.1 on the 13th of Nov, 2019))

iWork (Apple's Productivity Applications for the Desktop) now (as of macOS 10.15) comes in two different flavors. The desktop versions of Apple's productivity software started (initially released in 2013) out with Pages 5.0, Numbers 3.0, and Keynote 6.0. The 'Legacy' versions (originally releaseed in January of 2005) are no longer updated or supported. Up until macOS 10.15 (Catalina), the different versions could coexist on a Mac desktop. macOS 10.15 enforces a prohibition on the use of 32bit applications, so the old legacy versions of the iWork suite no longer works under macOS 10.15 (and later)). The iOS versions are built on a separate code-base, but they are document level compatible with documents created by the newer (64bit) versions of the productivity suite.

iWork is a home productivity contender; competing against Microsoft Office and the OpenOffice/LibreOffice productivity suites. Most home users don't need the power provided by Microsoft's productivity suite, and Apple's iWork suite provides a suitable alternative to the expensive Microsoft suite. iWork applications are Office compatible (No it's not 100% compatible, but it can open, edit and save documents as Office documents), and the pricing is far more affordable than the behemoth on the block (The Microsoft applications).

iWork consists of three productivity applications for desktop and mobile. The applications are also available in an on-line form through cloud-based integration with Apple's iCloud syncing, storing and colaboration services/features (go to icloud.com).

Pages - Pages is a word processing application with page layout features. Besides basic word processing functionality, Pages includes over a hundred templates designed by Apple that allow users to create various types of documents, including newsletters, invitations, stationery, and résumés, along with a number of education-themed templates (such as reports and outlines) for students and teachers.

Along with Keynote and Numbers, Pages integrates with Apple's iLife suite. Using the Media Browser, users can drag and drop movies, photos and music directly into documents within the Pages application. A Full Screen view hides the menubar and toolbars, and an outline mode allows users to quickly create outlines which can easily be rearranged by dragging and dropping, as well as collapsed and expanded. Pages includes support for entering complex equations with MathType 6 and for reference citing using EndNote X2.

The Pages application can open and edit Microsoft Word documents (including DOC and Office Open XML files), rich text format documents, and plain text documents. Pages can also export documents in the DOC, PDF, and ePub formats (from WikiPedia). Compatibility with other applications and formats is outstanding.

As of Jan 15, 2021 - I have Pages version 10.3.9 (7029.5.5) installed on my Mac, and Pages version 10.3.9 (7353.9.8) is installed on my iOS and iPadOS devices.

Keynote - Keynote is an application used to create and play presentations. Its features are comparable to those of Microsoft PowerPoint, though Keynote contains several unique features which differ from similar applications. Keynote, like Pages and Numbers, integrates with the iLife application suite. Users can drag and drop media from iMovie, iTunes, iPhoto and Aperture directly into Keynote presentations using the Media Browser. Keynote contains a number of templates, transitions, and effects. Magic Move allows users to apply simple transitions to automatically animate images and text that are repeated on consecutive slides. With dozens of Themes and Transitions to choose from, you can easily find a series of layouts and effects to help get your project started.

Keynote supports a number of file formats. By default, presentations are saved in a Keynote format. Keynote can open and edit Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt) files. In addition, presentations can be exported as Microsoft PowerPoint files, QuickTime movies (which are also playable on iPod and iPhone), HTML files, and PDF files.

As of Jan 15, 2021- I have Keynote version 10.3.9 (7029.9.8) installed on my Mac, and Keynote version 10.3.9 (7353.9.8) installed on my iOS and iPadOS devices.

Numbers - Numbers is a spreadsheet application that was added to the iWork suite in 2007 with the release of iWork '08. Numbers, like Microsoft Excel and other spreadsheet applications, lets users organize data into tables, perform calculations with formulas, and create charts and graphs using data entered into the spreadsheet. Numbers, however, differs from other spreadsheet applications in that it allows users to create multiple tables in a single document on a flexible canvas. Many prebuilt templates, including ones designed for personal finance, education, and business use, are included.

As of Jan 15, 2021 - I have Numbers version 10.3.9 (7029.9.8) installed on my Mac, and Numbers version 10.3.9 (7353.9.8) installed on my iOS and iPadOS devices.

The latest versions of Pages, Keynote and Numbers (as of Nov 2020) all use a completely new file format (as of the iWork update in Oct, 2013 - Released in conjunction with the new Mac OS X 10.9 upgrade) that can work across OS X, Windows, and in most web browsers by using the online iCloud web apps. I've been using Pages and Numbers successfully (in my D&D Campaign) for online, real-time, collaboration on mutliple different platforms (Mac's, Windows 10, iPads, Android devices) with very few problems (some mobile browsers/some browsers have issues accessing all the features of the iCloud hosted applications).

The complete overhaul and re-design of the iWorks suite (in 2013) changed the application's look and feel, eliminated some advanced features (most of those lost capabilities have returned), and made the old documents incompatible. While there were some draw-backs to the new applications, the overall change was positive (in the long run). The iCloud integration and collaboration features have definitely become a benefit. The best part about these new applications? As of September, 2013, Apple announced that iWork, (all three applications) iMovie and iPhoto would all be available as free downloads on any new iOS devices activated since the 1st of Sep, 2013. So the desktop suite comes free with the Mac OS, and now the iOS apps are free on any new iOS devices. That's good news. That's way cheaper than the $100+ price tag for the Microsoft applications. A similar change (to the iWork suite) occurred in 2019, when the applications went from 32bit to 64bit. That had less effect, making some applications and documents incompatible, but keeping the feature set intact.
<https://www.apple.com/ios/pages/compatibility/>
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IWork>
<https://www.apple.com/numbers/>
<https://www.apple.com/keynote/>
<https://www.apple.com/iwork/>
<https://www.apple.com/icloud/>
<https://www.apple.com/pages/>


 

GraphicConverter

 
GraphicConverter:
I'm currently using version 11.4.2 (4875) - As of Apr 09, 2021

One of my favorite pieces of software recently released an update (I'm doing my best to stay on track with all the latest updates). GraphicConverter moves ever forward. One more step towards perfection. Another product that's always getting better.

GraphicConverter is an image converter and editor. A fantastic piece of shareware that is well worth the price (~$40.00). I use it to convert image formats into web standard formats; to create and edit image maps and other graphics. I've been singing GC's praises for many years now, and I'm not sure what I would do without it. The best part about GC is it's creator/author. Thorsten Lemke is completely committed to his customer base. Constantly and Continuously responding to customer recommendations and bug reports. GC is a dynamic, evolving, application. Always on the cutting edge, an absolute must in any web developers tool box. At a fraction of PhotoShop's cost (and no monthly subscription fees!), this photo editor is a highly versatile application with all the bells and whistles. On par with the 'Very Expensive' top end editors, and no 'subscription fee' required!
<http://www.lemkesoft.de/en/products/graphicconverter/overview-of-new-features-and-versions/>


 

DVDPedia

 

DVDPedia:
Running version 6.1.0 - As of Jan 01, 2021

DVDPedia is a great little application for cataloging and displaying your movie collection. It's list of features is impressive, and it keeps getting better with every update. The database is capable of generating statistics, you can keep track of multiple collections, you can easily add titles by typing the name of the movie or you can scan the barcode (using your iSight camera or a barcode reader) right off the movie box (it then searches the internet, and displays choices). It has customizable HTML export capabilities, a 'borrowed' feature with address book integration, the ability to play movies in full screen mode, and many more features which make an awesome addition to your software library. I use DVDpedia to generate HTML listings of my movies and movie reviews.

The 5.0 upgrade was a paid upgrade/new version of the software. This version has been over a year in the making with lots of changes big and small to make the programs even better. What's new? Lots of new search sites including Wikipedia, Freebase and Doghouse, the Pedias' own media server built by and for Pedia users. New custom fields for broader cataloging options: TV series for DVDpedia, comics for Bookpedia and board games for Gamepedia (I may have to buy a copy now) as well as new custom fields including dedicated date fields, check boxes and multi-value fields. A 10-star rating system with half-stars; click twice on a star to make it a half. Swipe gestures for the CoverFlow and Add/Edit window to move back and forth as well as pinch-to-zoom in the Grid view. A new filter feature for the Details view and Statistics to quickly find entries with that same value. And much, much more.

The 6.1 upgrade (free to owners of a 5.0+ license) didn't include much in the way of new features, but it did make the application compatible with macOS 10.12 and above (including macOS 11.0+/Big Sur). The 5.0 and later versions of the software are built with an all new (64bit) core, and it includes many improvements and bug fixes. The code was thoroughly tested for several months. The new version is much faster and more robust, but it keeps the same familiar interface. Below are links to some of the pages I created using this software.
<https://www.robsworld.org/iphonemoviecollection/index.html>
<https://www.robsworld.org/mymovies/index.html>
<https://www.bruji.com/dvdpedia/new.html>
<https://www.robsworld.org/reviews.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/version5.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/dvdpedia/>
<http://doghouse.bruji.com/>


 

CDPedia

 

CDPedia:
Running version 6.1 - As of Jan 01, 2021

CDPedia is a great little application for cataloging and displaying your music collection. It's list of features is impressive, and it keeps getting better with every update. The database is capable of generating statistics, you can keep track of multiple collections, you can easily add titles by typing the name of the artist, album, or track. You can scan the barcode (using your iSight camera or a barcode reader) right off a jewel case (it then searches the internet, and displays choices), or you can import lists of music from iTunes. It has customizable HTML export capabilities, a 'borrowed' feature with address book integration, and many more features which make an awesome addition to your software library. I use CDPedia to generate HTML listings of my music.

The 5.0 upgrade was a paid upgrade/new version of the software. This version has been over a year in the making with lots of changes big and small to make the programs even better. What's new? Lots of new search sites including Wikipedia, Freebase and Doghouse, the Pedias' own media server built by and for Pedia users. New custom fields for broader cataloging options: TV series for DVDpedia, comics for Bookpedia and board games for Gamepedia (I may have to buy a copy now) as well as new custom fields including dedicated date fields, check boxes and multi-value fields. A 10-star rating system with half-stars; click twice on a star to make it a half. Swipe gestures for the CoverFlow and Add/Edit window to move back and forth as well as pinch-to-zoom in the Grid view. A new filter feature for the Details view and Statistics to quickly find entries with that same value. And much, much more.

The 6.1 upgrade (free to owners of a 5.0+ license) didn't include much in the way of new features, but it did make the application compatible with macOS 10.12 and above (including macOS 11.0+/Big Sur). The 5.0 and later versions of the software are built with an all new (64bit) core, and it includes many improvements and bug fixes. The code was thoroughly tested for several months. The new version is much faster and more robust, but it keeps the same familiar interface. Below are links to some of the pages I created using this software.
<https://www.robsworld.org/iphonemusiccollection/index.html>
<https://www.robsworld.org/mymusic/index.html>
<https://www.bruji.com/cdpedia/new.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/version5.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/cdpedia/>
<http://doghouse.bruji.com/>


 

Bookpedia

 

Bookpedia:
Running version 6.1 - As of Jan 01, 2021

Bookpedia is a great little application for cataloging and displaying your book collection(s). It's list of features is impressive, and it keeps getting better with every update. The database is capable of generating statistics, you can keep track of multiple collections, you can easily add titles by typing the name of the author, book, or isbn number. You can scan the barcode (using your iSight camera or a barcode reader) right off the book cover (the application searches the internet, and displays choices). It has customizable HTML export capabilities, a borrowed feature with address book integration, and many more features which make an awesome addition to your software library. I use Bookpedia to generate an HTML listing of my favorite books.

The 5.0 upgrade was a paid upgrade/new version of the software (The new version only runs on Intel architecture machines and it requires Leopard or better as an OS). This version has been over a year in the making with lots of changes big and small to make the programs even better. What's new? Lots of new search sites including Wikipedia, Freebase and Doghouse, the Pedias' own media server built by and for Pedia users. New custom fields for broader cataloging options: TV series for DVDpedia, comics for Bookpedia and board games for Gamepedia (I may have to buy a copy now) as well as new custom fields including dedicated date fields, check boxes and multi-value fields. A 10-star rating system with half-stars; click twice on a star to make it a half. Swipe gestures for the CoverFlow and Add/Edit window to move back and forth as well as pinch-to-zoom in the Grid view. A new filter feature for the Details view and Statistics to quickly find entries with that same value. And much, much more.

The 6.1 upgrade (free to owners of a 5.0+ license) didn't include much in the way of new features, but it did make the application compatible with macOS 10.12 and above (including macOS 11.0+/Big Sur). The 5.0 and later versions of the software are built with an all new (64bit) core, and it includes many improvements and bug fixes. The code was thoroughly tested for several months. The new version is much faster and more robust, but it keeps the same familiar interface. Below are links to some of the pages I created using this software.
<https://www.bruji.com/bookpedia/new.html>
<https://www.robsworld.org/books.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/version5.html>
<http://www.bruji.com/bookpedia/>
<http://doghouse.bruji.com/>


 

Logoist

 

Logoist:
Running version 4.1 (410001) - As of 17 Nov, 2020

I first purchased Logoist (From Apple's App Store) in January of 2018. Logoist is a Mac OS X application for creating high quality textual graphics, headings, logos, icons, web site elements and buttons. Thanks to its multi layer support (just like Photo Shop and other high end layout applications), creating complex graphics is no sweat. This software allows you to create awsesome title graphics for print or the web. Create catchy headings and other text graphics. Generate attractive buttons and cool titles to make your web site look stylish and professional. Various logos and icons can be easily created to enrich your brochures, flyers and postcards. I've put together a page with a few samples (my own designs). If you'd like to see more samples, you may find the developers website provides more and 'better' examples.

If I had to choose between these two applications (Art Text and Logoist), I would definitely choose Logoist. It's a better design tool. It's less buggy than Art Text (version 3 introduced some stability issues), and the interface is easier to use. I stopped updating Art Text on the 1st of May, 2020 (chose not to upgrade to version 4 (Of Art Text)).
<http://www.syniumsoftware.com/logoist/>


 

Transmit

 

Transmit:
I have a registered copy of version 5.7.4 (265137) - As of 20 Apr, 2021

An FTP tool that does it all. Anyone who publishes web pages eventually needs a way to upload their pages to a web site. I've found that stand alone FTP tools are the best for this task. Transmit has a clean and easy to use interface, and some really nifty features, like the ability to resume a transfer that's been interrupted, advanced site synchronization capabilities (with simulation mode and reporting capabilities), Amazon S3 integration, sync your favorites using Dropbox, drag-to-dock sending, creation / use of transfer droplets, column views, quick navigation side-bar, multi-connection transfers, built in compression, a built in text editor, remote file editing using local editors, and secure transfer (in various different flavors) capabilities. Check out the Panic.com Release Notes for Transmit.
<http://www.panic.com/transmit/>
<http://www.panic.com/transmit/releasenotes.html>


 

Safari

 

Safari:
I'm currently running Version 14.1.1 (16611.2.7.1.4) - As of 29 Mar, 2021

Apple's default web browser for OS X is way ahead of the pack. Apple's browser contains a plethora of incredibly powerful features, and this release moves the browser forwardn for all users of Apple products (Note: Apple made a version of Safari for Windows (ver 5.0 - 5.1.7) from 2010 through 2012).

Battle of the browsers. Chrome vs FireFox. Those are your choices right? Wrong! Think different! Think Mac! A fast but full featured browser, which performs like a pro. The full release version is a powerful workhorse - Featuring tabbed browsing, URL snap-back, a powerful but elegant bookmark implementation (with built-in import capability), Google, Yahoo and Bing search integration, built-in pop-up blocker, extensive privacy protection, multiple standards (HTML 4.01, HTML 5, XML, XPath, XSLT, XHTML, DOM, CSS, CSS3, ECMA Script, Proxy Support, SSL, TLS, JavaScript, QuickTime, and others plug-ins and extensions (all plug-ins are throughly vetted for security reasons), Built in sandboxing for each tab - If one tab locks up, the entire application doesn't stop working. Top sites - A visual representation of your top visited sites. Safari Reader mode - banish all those annoying sidebars and adds. Expanded support for HTML 5 and the new JavaScript Nitro Engine implementation - Makes Safari the fastest in the pack. Note: As of version 14.0, support for Flash has been removed (finally!).
<https://developer.apple.com/safari/>
<https://www.apple.com/safari/>


Many of the icons you see on this page were not created by the Author listed below. They were culled from various parent application resource files, or downloaded from the software producer's website. They are copyrighted by the respective application authors. The use here (without explicit permission) is done purely for review and commentary of the product (fair use). I am not trying to sell these products or claim copyright on the works / images depicted. Note: The 'Mac tools for HTML' banner (at the top of the page) is my work/I hold the copyright for that.

Author: Robert L. Vaessen e-mail:
Last Updated: